The Hymns and Carols of Christmas

How Bright Appears Our Morning Star

For Epiphany

Words: Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, Philipp Nicolai, 1597

Translation: John Henry Hopkins, 1866

Music: Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern, Philip Nicolai, 1599.
The melody is said to be from an older tune from Strasbourg, circa 1538.
MIDI / Noteworthy Composer / XML
Meter: 887 887 48 48

Source: John Henry Hopkins, Poems by the Wayside: Written During More Than Forty Years (New York: James Pott, 1883), pp. 303-304.

1. How bright appears our Morning Star!
In Grace and Truth He shines from far,
     With giant strength and splendor:
Good Shepherd, royal David's Son,
Now reigning from His heavenly throne,
     Our God and our Defender.
Precious, gracious, ever glorious
          And victorious
          Is my Saviour;
He alone is Bang for ever.

2. O Crown of Beauty clear and bright,
Thou God of God, and Light of Light,
     From heaven to earth descending,—
My heart triumphant joy hath found,
It thrills at Thy sweet Gospel's sound,
     And feels Thy life unending.
Keep me with Thee, ever cleaving,
          Never leaving,
          Dear and dearer,
As my soul to Thee draws nearer.

3. Thou Brightness of the Father's face,
Pour in my heart Thy burning rays,
     Till love there kindle glowing;
Then feed my soul on heavenly food,
Thy Word and Spirit, Flesh and Blood,
     Their inward life bestowing.
Dear Lord Jesu, Thine arms hold me,
          And enfold me,
          Now and ever!
None shall pluck me thence; no, never!

4. Then sing for joy, ye sons of song,
Your loudest organ-tones prolong
     To swell the exulting chorus!
Our praises shall resound again,
When we have joined the shining train
     Of saints gone home before us.
There shall we all sing for ever,
          And for ever,
          Alleluia,
Alleluia, Alleluia.

1866.

 

Note by Hopkins at p. 323:

How bright appears our Morning Star! – This is a new translation of Wie schon leucht't und der Morgenstern, – so freely made that it hardly deserves the name of a translation. The last stanza is an entire addition.

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