The Hymns and Carols of Christmas

Two Hundred Folk Carols

Richard Runciman Terry

London: Burns Oates & Washbourne Limited, 1933

Note: There is no evidence of a copyright claim in this volume.

Editor's Note: More so than other pages on this website, this is a page under construction. Having created the Contents page, now comes the pleasant, but time consuming, task of incorporating the carol texts and sheet music.

Also by Rev. Terry:

Twelve Christmas Carols
L
ondon: J. Curwen & Sons, Ltd., 1912; With Music

Gilbert and Sandys' Christmas Carols
London: Burns, Oates & Washbourne, Ltd., 1931; With Music

I am endeavoring to locate copies of other collections by Rev. Terry. Next to come will be his "A Medieval Carol Book," consisting of carols from a manuscript in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, in the Library of Trinity College, Cambridge, and elsewhere.

Contents of Two Hundred Folk Carols.

This remarkable collection of 200 carols is composed of eleven parts.

Part I. English Traditional Carols. (1-39)

Part II. French Traditional Carols (40-57)

Part III. Besançon Noëls (58-67)

Part IV. Bearnaise and Burgundian Noëls (68-78)

Part V. Provençal Carols (79-91)

Part VI. Basque Carols (92-109)

Part VII. Dutch and Flemish Carols (110-128)

Part VIII. Italian Carols (129-138)

Part IX. German, Alsatian and Polish Carols (139-159)

Part X. European Medieval Carols (160-171)

Part XI. English Medieval Carols (172-200)

Preface & Acknowledgements

 

Part I. English Traditional Carols. (1-39)

No.

Title

Source of Tune

Page

1

The Lord At First Did Adam Make

Gilbert's Christmas Carols, 1822

2

2

The Lord At First Had Adam Made

Sandys' Christmas Carols, 1833

4

3

A Virgin Most Pure (I)

Gilbert's Christmas Carols

6

4

A Virgin Most Pure (II)

Sandys' Christmas Carols

8

5

When Righteous Joseph Wedded Was (I)

Gilbert's Christmas Carols

10

6

When Righteous Joseph Wedded Was (II)

Sandys' Christmas Carols

12

7

God's Dear Son Without Beginning

Gilbert's Christmas Carols

14

8

Let All That Are To Mirth Inclined

Gilbert's Christmas Carols

16

9

The First Nowel

Traditional

18

10

Fyfe's Noel

Fyfe's Christmas Carols, 1860

20

11

God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen (I)

Sandys' Christmas Carols

22

12

God rest you merry (II)

Traditional

24

13

This New Christmas Carol

Sandys' Christmas Carols

26

14

Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day

Sandys' Christmas Carols

28

15

I saw three ships

Traditional

30

16

Joseph was an old man
Part 1 of The Cherry Tree Carol

Sandys' Christmas Carols

31

17

Joseph and the Angel
Part 2 of The Cherry Tree Carol

Fyfe's Christmas Carols, 860

32

18

Mary's question
Part 3 of The Cherry Tree Carol

Traditional

33

19

When Jesus Christ Was Twelve Years Old

Sandys' Christmas Carols

34

20

In Those Twelve Days

Sandys' Christmas Carols

36

21

Saint Stephen Was An Holy Man

Sandys' Christmas Carols

38

22

Oh, Who Would Be A Shepherd Boy

Melody entitled “Lord Thomas” from Sandys' Christmas Carols

40

23

Novels
First line: A Child This Day Is Born

Sandys' Christmas Carols

41

24

In Bethlehem City, On Christmas-day Morn - Woodward

Traditional (Worcestershire)

42

25

The Seven Joys of Mary

Traditional

44

26

The Seven Rejoices Of Mary

Traditional

46

27

The Babe in Bethlehem's Manger

Traditional (Kent)

48

28

On Christmas night

Traditional (Sussex)

49

29

A child my choice

Traditional

50

30

The moon shines bright (“The Wait's Carol)

Traditional

52

31

While shepherds watched

Traditional

54

32

See, Amid The Winter's Snow

Traditional

56

33

Dives and Lazarus

Traditional

58

34

Glory to God in heights of heaven

Traditional (Wiltshire)

60

35

The joyful sounds of salvation

Traditional

62

37

The Black Decree

Traditional

66

38

Our Blessed Lady's Lullaby

English (“Sellinger's Round”) 16th century

68

39

Sweet was the song the virgin sang

William Ballet's Lute Book (17th century)

70

 

Part II. French Traditional Carols (40-57)

Note: Add French titles, if possible.

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

40

O Hinds, tune up your pipes

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

2

41

He is born, the Holy One

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

4

42

The silent, heaven!

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

6

43

Saviour sweet, O Babe of love

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

8

44

O lovely Infant born for me

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

10

45

Fair is my lot

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

12

46

Come all ye of tender years

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

14

47

Come and see the Holy One

“Dictionnaire de Noës et Cantiques”

16

48

Shepherds from the mountains

Traditional (Chartres)

18

49

With hearts afire

Traditional

20

50

I the Angel am of God

(“Les Noëls Bressans”)

22

51

What is this fragrance?

Traditional (Lorraine)

24

52

Morning hush

From Denisot, 1553

26

53

I know, O blessed Mary

Traditional

28

54

Glad tidings

Traditional

30

55

Angels, we have heard your voices

Traditional

32

54

Bethlehem

Traditional

34

57

O night, restful and deep

Traditional (Basse-Normandie)

36

 

Part III. Besançon Noëls (58-67)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

58

Leave shepherds, leave your peaceful flocks

Traditional

2

59

With happy hearts united

Traditional

4

60

Hail! Shepherds, hail!

Traditional

6

61

If you shepherds watched the lambing

Traditional

8

62

Up and shake thee, Peterkin

Traditional

10

63

We've been told a joyful thing

Traditional

12

64

Shepherds, lead on to Bethlehem

Traditional

14

65

I'm leaving home seeking my fortune

Traditional

16

66

Put by your business worry

Traditional

18

67

Upon a wisp of litter

Traditional

20

 

Part IV. Bearnaise and Burgundian Noëls (68-78)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

68

Up, Up, Pierre

Traditional (Bearnaise)

2

69

Mary's Magnificat

Traditional (Bearnaise)

4

70

Cheer up old woman

Traditional (Burgundian)

6

71

Every year as round comes Christmas

Traditional (Burgundian)

8

72

Brothers, 'tis the holy season

Traditional (Burgundian)

10

73

I hear upon the highway

Traditional (Burgundian)

12

74

The trumpet carol

Traditional (Burgundian)

14

75

Patapan

Traditional (Burgundian)

16

76

Eloquent bells in every steeple

Traditional (Burgundian)

18

77

Now let us sing I pray thee

Traditional (Burgundian)

20

78

Neighbour mine

Traditional (Burgundian)

22

 

Part V. Provençal Carols (79-91)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

79

You that make a toil of pleasure

Traditional

2

80

The Gouty Carol

Traditional

4

81

The Bagpipe Carol

Traditional

6

82

The Laundry Carol

Traditional

8

83

The Gossoon and the Gaffer

Traditional

10

84

The Weather Carol

Traditional

12

85

Steady Neighbours

Traditional

14

86

Noel, a new Noel

Traditional

16

87

The Peasant's Pilgrimage

Traditional

18

88

Nicholas the shepherd

Traditional

22

89

Adam and his helpmate

Traditional

24

90

Shepherds, be joyful

Traditional

26

91

I woke; from my couch uprising

Traditional

28

 

Part VI. Basque Carols (92-109)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

92

O Bethlehem!

Traditional

2

93

When David's daughter

Traditional

4

94

Stars and hills so hoary

Traditional

6

95

Great gentlefolk hold and bethink you

Traditional

8

96

In middle winter they set out

Traditional

10

97

Gods of the heathen

Traditional

12

98

Praise Jesus Christ who came this night

Traditional

14

99

We sing of David's daughter

Traditional

16

100

There came a shy Intruder

Traditional

18

101

A maiden was adoring God the Lord

Traditional

20

102

Sing the universal glory

Traditional

22

103

How the banner'd Angels

Traditional

24

104

Christian men, look up on high

Traditional

26

105

Why should we go grieving?

Traditional

28

106

Who were the shepherds, Mary?

Traditional

30

107

Lovely Baby, Mary bore Him

Traditional

32

108

Lead me to Thy peaceful manger

Traditional

34

109

Bethlehem's stall

Traditional

36

 

Part VII. Dutch and Flemish Carols (110-128)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

110

There was a maid so lovely

Traditional

2

111

With heart and spirit reconciled

Traditional

4

112

Children sing a carol splendid

Traditional

6

113

When Judah's loyal soul

Traditional

8

114

To us a little child is born

Traditional

9

115

A year begins of joy and grace

Traditional

10

116

Our Lady on Christmas Day

Traditional

12

117

Welcome, Son of Mary

Traditional

14

118

Whenas the Rose of Jericho

Traditional

16

119

There was a maiden

Traditional

17

120

All heaven on a maiden

Traditional

18

121

Shepherds, what joyful tidings

Traditional

20

122

O Mary, Well of Purity

Traditional

22

123

O Jesus, true and fervent friend

Traditional

23

124

I must go gather comfort

Traditional

24

125

Our Master hath a garden

Traditional

26

126

The world has waited long

Traditional

28

127

A Little Child came yester morning

Traditional

30

128

Jesus in the Stall

Traditional

32

 

Part VIII. Italian Carols (129-138)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

129

Ninna, Nanna

Library of S. Maria Sopra Minerva

2

130

Three Kings Came Riding

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

4

131

Shepherds why do ye Terry?

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

6

132

Sleep no more

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

8

133

Now many a King I dreaming

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

10

134

Shepherds the day is breaking

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

12

135

Dark is the even

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

14

136

O shepherds sing together

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

16

137

O joyful shepherds make haste

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

18

138

To weary shepherds sleeping

'Laude Spirituali,' 1674

20

 

Part IX. German, Alsatian and Polish Carols (139-159)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

139

Magnum Nomen Domini
Great is Our Lord Jesu's Name

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

2

140

Christo incarnato
Behold the Godhead's triune blaze

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

6

141

Eia mea anima
Now my soul to Bethlehem

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

8

142

Nobis est natus
This happy morn

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

10

143

Parvulus nobis nascitur
To us a little Child is born

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

12

144

Puer nobis nascitur
To all men a Child is come

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

14

145

Universi populi
Voice your joy together now

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

16

146

En natus est Emanuel
This day is born Emmanuel

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

18

147

I know a flower

M. Praetorius. “Musae Sionae,” 1609

20

148

Pangamus melos gloriae
Sing out a song of victory

Dreves, “Analecta Hymnica”

22

149

Puer natus in Bethlehem
A Boy is born in Bethlehem

Dreves, “Analecta Hymnica”

24

150

All the skies to-night sing o'er us

J. G. Ebeling, Harmonized
J. S. Bach

26

151

Cradle Song of the Infant Jesus

Traditional Melody

28

152

Susani, susani

Traditional

30

153

The World's Desire

Traditional

31

154

In dulci jubilo

Traditional. Trans. And Harmonized by R. L. de Pearsall

32

155

Joy to the world

Melody by N. Hermann, 1560

34

156

A Babe is born

Traditional (Nuremberg, 1676)

35

157

The shepherds went their hasty way

Traditional (Alsatian)

36

158

At the Nativity

Traditional (Alsatian)

38

159

Tell, O Shepherds!

Traditional (Polish)

40

 

MICHAEL PRAETORIUS was born at Kreuzberg in Thuringia, on Feb. 15, 1571 ; he began his artistic career, in the character of capellmeister, at Liineburg; in 1604 he entered the service of the Duke of Brunswick, first as organist, and then as capellmeister and secretary; he was appointed Prior of the Monastery of Ringelheim, near Gozlar, without necessity of residence ; and died at Wolfenbiittel, on his fiftieth birthday, Feb. 15, 1621.

The compositions of Michael Praetorius are very voluminous. He himself has left us, at the end of his Syntagma llfusicum, a catalogue, the most important items of which are, fifteen volumes of ‘Polyhymnia,’ adapted partly to Latin, and partly to German words; sixteen volumes of “Musae Sionae,” of which the first five are in Latin, and the remainder in German ; nine volumes of a secular work, called ‘Musa Aonia,’ of which the several books are entitled ‘Terpsichore’ (2 vols.), ‘Calliope’ (2 vols.), ‘Thalia’ (2 vols.), ‘Erato’ (1 vol.), ‘Diana Teutonica ’ (1 vol.), and Regensburgische Echo (1 vol.); and a long list of other works, ‘ partly printed, and partly, through God’s mercy, to be printed.’ The first of these is the Syntagma Musieum (Musical Treatise) itself-—a book the excessive rarity and great historical value of which entitle it to a special notice.

Source: Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 3 (Macmillan Company, 1907).

 

Part X. European Medieval Carols (160-171)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

160

Good King Wenceslas

Piae Cantiones (1582)

2

161

Good Christian men rejoice

Piae Cantiones

4

162

Congaudeat turba fidelium
Come ye faithful

Piae Cantiones

6

163

Ecce novum gaudium
Here is joy for every one

Piae Cantiones

8

164

Ave Maris Stella lucens
Hail Thou Star that guidest

Piae Cantiones

10

165

Resonet in laudibus
Now with gladness carol we

Piae Cantiones

12

166

Verbum caro facctum est
God's own Word our flest did take

Piae Cantiones

14

167

Omnis mundus jucundetur
Let the earth rejoice in chorus

Piae Cantiones

16

168

Dies est leticiae
Christian folk, day of joy

Piae Cantiones

18

169

Angelus emittitur
Gabriel from heaven has flown

Piae Cantiones

20

170

Quem pastores laudavere
Shepherds tell your beauteous story

Hohenfurt MS. (fifteenth century)

22

171

Personet hodie
Lift your voices and sing

Piae Cantiones

24

 

A single copy of Piae Cantiones found its way into the hands of Rev. John Mason Neale and Rev. Thomas Helmore in 1853, and from this exceptionally rare volume a good deal of music was saved from oblivion. For more information, see Piae Cantiones: A Medieval Song Treasury.

 

Part XI. English Medieval Carols (172-200)

No.

Title

Source of Melody

Page

172

Now well may we merthis make

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

2

173

An heavenly song

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

4

174

As I lay upon a night

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

6

175

What tidings bringest thou messenger?

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

8

176

Of a Rose sing we

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

10

177

From the Royal shepherd's line

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

12

178

Cast away the olden

Bodleian Library (MS. Eng. Poet)

14

179

Alleluya. The joy of Virgin Mary

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

16

180

Though they cannot palter

Bodleian Library (MS. Ashmole 1393)

18

181

Sing we to this merry company

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

20

182

Ave Domina... Worshipt be the birth

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

22

183

Make we joy now in this Fest

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

24

184

Nowel this is the salutation

Bodleian Library (MS. Eng. Poet)

26

185

Nowel Sing we both all and some

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

28

186

Nowel. Out of your sleep arise

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

30

187

Nowel. To us is born our God

Bodleian Library (Selden MS.)

32

188

Hail Mary full of grace

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

34

189

Alma redemptoris... As I lay upon a night

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

36

190

Now may we singen as it is

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

38

191

Be merry, be merry

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

40

192

Eta martyr Stephane

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

41

193

Now make we merthe

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

42

194

Pray for us the Prince of Piece

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

44

195

There is no rose of such virtue

Trinity College Library. Cambridge

45

196

Sir Christmas

British Museum Addl. MSS. 5665

46

197

This Enders night

British Museum Roy. App.

49

198

Qui creavit coilum
He by whom the heavens were made

The Chester Mysteries

52

199

The Coventry Carol

The Coventry Mysteries

54

200

Angelus ad Virginem
Gabriel to Mary went

British Museum (Cotton MS.)

55

 

Preface

Pages vii-ix.

This collection has been primarily compiled for the use of choirs, but it cannot be too strongly emphasized that all of the carols – save the definitely polyphonic ones (e.g., those of Praetorius) – can be effectively sung as solos, or by voices in unison, with or without accompaniment. The bulk of them are folk-melodies, and should be treated as such. Even the carols of Praetorius are simple harmonizations of popular melodies.

The custom of carol-singing in churches is a modern development, although the practice can be traced back to Saboly in the 17th century. Originally the carol was a folk-song with the Incarnation as its theme. The treatment of the subject varied through the ages from the crude patois of the peasant to the polished periods of later poets, but naȉveté and homeliness were the predominant characteristics. Modes of expression more frequently crude and details were sometimes stressed with what present-day ars would seem coarseness. But behind all this there was the dominating idea of joyfulness in the Feast of Our Lord's Nativity. All Europe celebrated the Nativity at Christmastide, not as the memory of a long past event but as something which was actually happening. Neighbor called to neighbor to join the pilgrimage to Bethlehem that they might find the new-born Babe and worship Him. Every mother's heart yearned over Him in His helplessness. Every mother's heart ached in sympathy with Our Lady in her pains. Let us take food (said the good folk to one another) to the Holy Family in their hunger; let us take clothing for the little Babe in His nakedness. The phrase “Let us now go even unto Bethlehem” was not to them mere chronicled speech of some Shepherds of olden time; it was a direct personal appeal from neighbor to neighbor to hasten to the Crib in company with the Shepherds who were making their journey hic et nunc.

That was the old idea of Christmas – a united Christendom celebrating this Christian Feast in which everyone was a partaker. It is this aspect of Christmas which the Editor has aimed at presenting rather than the popular modern one of holly and ivy, robins and snowflakes, roast beef and beer, yule-logs, punch bowls, plum pudding and the rest of the wassailing apparatus which genial old Charles Dickens invented for his generation.

Carol-singing in England had almost disappeared as a national pastime by the early 19th century, and the antiquaries who endeavored to rescue its fragmentary remains from oblivion all spoke of carols as an interesting survival of a practice which had passed away forever. Carol-singing has now achieved a popular vogue, but that vogue dates back no further than the 'seventies of the last century.

On the continent of Europe there has been no such break with tradition. Continental nations continue to sing carols as they have been wont to do since the earliest times. They are inheritors of a wealth of carol-music and carol-literature of which England has only in recent years (seemingly) become aware, with the result that there is now an increasing demand for a wider repertoire than has hitherto been available; each English-edited carol book contains more foreign carols than its predecessors. It is hoped that the present collection (containing a large number of both English and foreign carols hitherto unpublished in this country) will do something to supply this increasing demand.

The compilers “editorial methods” in respect of English carols have been sufficiently explained elsewhere (Footnote 1) and need not be repeated here.

Footnote

1. Twelve Christmas Carols [1912], Old Christmas Carols [49 pages, 1923], A Medieval Carol Book [66 pages, 1932], and The Carols of Gilbert and Sandys [1931] (all published by Messrs Burns Oates & Washbourne Ltd.).

Regarding foreign carols, the originals have been consulted where available. Failing that, the editor has taken his material from recognized collectors (e.g., Saboly in the past and Father Donostia in the present).

Note: Nicolas Saboly (1614-1675), was Choir Master of the St-Pierre church in Avignon. See: Un flambeau, Jeanette Isabella (at the Choral Public Domain Library). He wrote a number of noels. A scanned copy of one collection is at Google Books, Recueils de Noëls provençaux.

Concerning Fr. Donostia, I have only been able to discover that he was a collector of Basque carols.

As regards the translations of the Latin, French, and German carols his librettists have gone direct to the original texts. In the case of old Dutch, old Italian, Provençal, Basque, Burgundian, and patois carols the editor has been fortunate enough to obtain the help of experts who have furnished him with literal translations. From these the librettists have composed their verses. Readers may therefore be assured that in this collection they will find no ”faked” English texts. The widest latitude must necessarily be allowed to librettists and their methods of expression, but whether the verses in this collection are literal translations or free paraphrases, there will at least be found in them nothing contrary to the originals.

And here, perhaps, it is well to say a few plain words:

Continental carols (German as well as French, Italian, Spanish and Dutch) teem with references to the Holy Family – Our Lord, the Blessed Virgin and St. Joseph.

It is a common thing to find English” translations” in which these references to St. Joseph – but more especially Our Lady – are eliminated and the doctrinal terminology watered down until its meaning is lost.

It is open to any editor of the foreign carol to say: “We do not accept the theology of which this carol is the expression; we have therefore provided the tune with fresh words.” Such a proceeding would be quite honest. The same can hardly be said when the singer is left under the impression that the English “translation” conveys the sense of the original, when in reality it does nothing of the sort. To reject a verbal text in toto is legitimate (provided the fact be stated); to tamper with a verbal text (so that it conveys a different meaning from the original) is not only disingenuous but unscholarly.

This tampering seems to be peculiar to England. It does not obtain in Protestant Germany. German editors are as conscientiously Protestant as English ones, but they have not found it necessary to eliminate references to the Virgin Mother or otherwise distort the meaning of an original text.

It is in such matters as this that we are so sore a puzzle to the intelligent foreigner. He hears rapturous encores of Schubert's of Ave Maria; he listens to hearty applause of Gounod's setting (on Bach's First Prelude) which concludes with an appeal to the Blessed Virgin to “pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death”; he hears the doctrine of Purgatory enunciated in Elgar's Gerontius by choral societies made up from every religious denomination. He naturally concludes that if such theological terminology is accepted as a matter of course on the concert platform it is rather childish (or at best illogical) to boggle at it in a carol.

What the intelligent for nor does not know is that the ordinary Englishman of today is much too enlightened to do anything of the sort; that the quotation mark boggling” is confined to cautious editors catering for an imaginary public, or “sectarian” editors introducing their particular “doxy” by way of the back stairs.

The popularity of the carols edited by the Rev. Dr. Woodward and the late Dr. Charles Wood, with their fidelity to original texts, goes to confirm what I say, and I have humbly endeavored to follow in the footsteps of these two Masters. Whatever may be urged against the translations in the present collection, at least it cannot be said that any original text has been tampered with for theological reasons. It ought perhaps to be added back (saving the nine Prætorius carols) all the harmonies in this book are by the editor and are therefore copyright.

Oxford 1932.

R. R. T.

 

Acknowledgments

For literal translations from obsolete languages I owe deep thanks to Dr. G. C. Wheeler, from fifteenth-century Dutch originals; Mr. F. Whitehead (Jesus College, Oxford) from old Italian, Provencal, medieval and patois originals; Mr. Rodney Gallop (author of A Book of The Basques) from Basque originals. Also to Miss M. G. Segar, M.A., B.Litt. (Oxford) for valuable assistance in modernising English medieval texts.

For verse translations from the Latin I thank the Rev. John O'Connor and the Rev. Ronald Knox; from the French, Canon John Gray and Mrs. K. W. Simpson; for original verses Mr. W. H. Shewring (Corpus Christi College, Oxford), and to Mr. G. K. Chesterton for permission to reprint his poem “The Christ Child lay on Mary's lap.” To the Rev. Dr. G. R. Woodward for permission to use the words and melody of “In Bethlehem City” and the words of “I Know a Flower”. To Dr. R. Vaughan-Williams for permission to use the melody of “On Christmas Night.”

To the authorities of the Bodleian Library I am indebted not only for permission to print carols from their various M.S. Collections, but also for much courtesy and kindly assistance in the course of my work. To the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge, for permission to photograph and score the contents of the parchment roll from which eight of the carols in this book are taken. To Miss Hilda Andrews, Mus.Bac., for copying the examples from the British Museum. To the Abbott of Downside for the loan of Laude Spirituali from which most of the Italian carols have been taken. To the Rev. F. Donostia for permission to use the Basque melodies collected by him. To Professor J. F. Larcher for photographs of “Sweet was the song the Virgin sang” (from Wm Ballet's Lute Book), and to the Provost and Fellows of Trinity College, Dublin, for kindly allowing me to make use of the same. Lastly, I am very deeply indebted to Mr. Henry Wardale, Mus. D., F.R.C.O., or undertaking the laborious task of proof-correcting.

Note: Rev. Terry has a page at the Choral Public Domain Library (Richard R. Terry), which contains the arrangements of two of his compositions:

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