The Hymns and Carols of Christmas

Savior, Who, Exalted High

For the Feast of SS. James and Jude, or Lent

Words: Bishop Richard Mant (1776-1848), 1828.

Music: Not stated (but see below)

Source: Richard Mant, Biographical Notices of the Apostles, Evangelists and Other Saints (Oxford: J. Parker, 1828), pp. 536-539.

Nine stanzas of 12 lines.

1

Saviour, who, exalted high
In thy Father's majesty,
Yet vouchsafest thyself to shew
To thy faithful flock below;
Foretaste of that blissful sight,
When array'd in glorious light,
Beaming with paternal grace,
They shall see thee face to face:
Saviour, tho' this earthy shroud
Now my mortal vision cloud,
Still thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me!

2

Son of God, to thee I cry!
By the holy mystery
Of thy dwelling here on earth;
By thy pure and holy birth,
Offspring of the Virgin's womb;
By the light, thro' midnight gloom
Bursting on the shepherds' gaze;
By the Angels' song of praise;
By the leading of the star,
The eastern sages' guide from far;
By their gifts, with worship meet
Offer'd at thy infant feet:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me!

3

Son of man, to thee I cry!
By thy holy infancy;
By the rite, when first began
Thy keeping of the law for man;
By thy early duty vow'd,
A firstborn, in the house of God;
By the wisdom past thine age,
Questions deep, and answers sage,
While the listening elders heard
Rapture-struck each wondrous word:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me!

4

Jesus, Saviour, hear me cry!
By thy lowly piety;
By the hallowed water shed
Duly on thy righteous head;
By thy fasting, lone and long,
Borne the savage beasts among,
In the desert's solitude;
By the tempter's wiles subdued;
By thy triple conquest won;
Proofs of God's beloved Son:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me.

5

Christ, Anointed, hear me cry!
By thy awful ministry;
By thy works with mercy fraught,
Wisely plann'd, and greatly wrought;
By thy lessons, just and sure,
Doctrines true, and precepts pure;
By the lore thy actions teach,
Sinless life, and guileless speech;
By the signs, with grace endued,
The cleansing font, the heavenly food:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me!

6

Lamb of God, to thee I cry!
By thy bitter agony;
By the blood thy flesh distill'^;
By thy soul with anguish thrill'd;
By thy visage, marr'd and soil'd;
By thy form, of beauty spoil'd,
In the robe of scorn array'd,
Taunted, inock'd, revil'd, betray'd,
Smitten, bound, with scourges torn,
Griding nails, and platted thorn;
By thy lip all parch'd and dry;
By thy loud desponding cry;
By thy spirit's parting groan;
By thy pangs to us unknown,
Felt by thee, and thee alone:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me!

7

Man of sorrows, hear me cry!
By thy great humility;
By thy meekly-bowed head;
By thy gentle spirit fled
To the mansions of the dead;
By the wound, whence issuing flow'd
Water mingled with thy blood;
By thy breathless body laid
In the rock's sepulchral shade,
Where man ne'er before repos'd,
Straitly watch'd, securely clos'd:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me 1

8

Prince of life, to thee I cry!
By thy glorious majesty;
By the earthquake's powerful shock;
By the opening of the rock;
By thy triumph o'er the grave,
Meek to suffer, strong to save;
By the serpent's bruised head;
By thy captors captive led;
By thy re-ascent to heaven;
By thy Holy Spirit given,
"When on thy Apostles came
Bushing wind, and tongues of flame:
Lord, thy presence let me see,
Manifest thyself to me!

9

Lord of glory, God most high,
Man exalted to the sky,
God and man, to thee I cry!
With thy love my bosom fill;
Prompt me to perform thy will;
Grant me, what thou bidd'st, to do;
What thou proffer'st, to pursue:
So may He, the Sire above,
Guard me with a parent's love!
So may He, the Spirit blest,
Whisper comfort, hope, and rest!
So mayst Thou, my Saviour, come,
Make this froward heart thy home,
And manifest thyself to me
In the triune Deity!

 

Note:

Dr. Julian writes that this poem originally appeared in 10 stanzas. Unfortunately, I have only been able to find nine. However, since several hymnal editors have made reference to "the original nine verses," therefore, I assume that "10 stanzas" in The Dictionary of Hymnology may have been a typographic error.

First lines in Mant:

1. Saviour, who, exalted high
2. Son of God, to thee I cry!
3. Son of man, to thee I cry!
4. Jesus, Saviour, hear me cry!
5. Christ, Anointed, hear me cry!
6. Lamb of God, to thee I cry!
7. Man of sorrows, hear me cry!
8. Prince of life, to thee I cry!
9. Lord of glory, God most high

 

Saviour, Who exalted high. Bp. B. Mant. [SS. James and Jude, or Lent.]

Appeared In his Holy Days of the Church; or Scripture Narratives of Our Blessed Lord's Life and Ministry, Ac, 1828, vol. i. p. 536, in 10 stanzas of irregular lines, and appropriated to SS. James and Jude. The original text is not in C. U. From it, however, the following centos have been compiled :

1. Saviour, Who exalted high. In the 1864 Supplement to the Psalms & Hymns, &c, Bedford, this cento is taken from stanzas i., ii., vii. and x. It is also in other collections.

2. Son of Man, to Thee we cry. This cento in 4 stanzas of 6 1., beginning with the first line of stanza III., was given in the Cooke and Denton Hymnal, 1853; and is also in several later collections. Editor's Note: a version with the same title occurs in Charles Rogers, ed., Lyra Britannica (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1867), pp. 392-93, in four verses of six lines.

3. Son of God, to Thee I cry. This cento, beginning with stanza ii., appeared in the 1863 Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns, No. 90, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines. [1882 EDITION] This, with the exception of the opening line, is from the Cooke and Denton Hymnal with a return, in several instances, to the original text. It is repeated In the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns, 1871, as "Son of Man, to Thee I cry."

4. Jesus Christ exalted high. This, in T. Darling's Hymns, &c, 1887, is in 4 stanzas of 12 lines. In the earlier editions of Darling's Hymns, &c, It began "Jesus, now exalted high." [Epiphany, XLVI]. Editor's note: I was unable to locate the 1887 edition of Darling's Hymns.

The popular form of this hymn is the third cento as above. [J. J.]

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

 

Biographical Note from John Julian, The Dictionary of Hymnology.

Mant, Richard D.D., son of the Rev. Richard Mant, Master of the Grammar School, Southampton, was born at Southampton, Feb. 12, 1776. He was educated at Winchester and Trinity, Oxford (B.A. 1797, M.A., 1799). At Oxford he won the Chancellor's prize for an English essay: was a Fellow of Oriel, and for some time College Tutor. On taking Holy Orders he was successively curate to his father, then of one or two other places, Vicar of Coggeshall, Essex, 1810; Domestic Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, 1813, Rector of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate, London. 1816, and East Horsley, 1818, Bishop of Killaloe, 1820, of Down and Connor, 1823, and of Dromore, 1842. He was also Bampton Lecturer in 1811. He died Nov. 2, 1848. His prose works were numerous, and although now somewhat obsolete, they were useful and popular in their day. His poetical works, and other works which contain poetical pieces, are:

(1) The Country Curate, 1804; (2) Poems in three Parts, 1806; (3) The Slave, 1807; (4) The Book of Psalms in an English Metrical Version, &c, 1824; (5) The Holydays of the Church; or Scripture Narratives of Our Blessed Lord's Life and Ministry, and Biographical Notices of the Apostles, Evangelists, and Other Saints, with Reflections, Collects, and Metrical Sketches, vol. i., 1828; vol. ii., 1831; (6) The Gospel Miracles in a series of Poetical Sketches, &c., 1832; (7) The British Months, 2 vols., 1836; (8) Ancient Hymns from the Roman Breviary, for Domestick Use. . . .To which are added Original Hymns, principally of Commemoration and Thanksgiving for Christ's Holy Ordinances, 1837: new ed., 1871. (9) The Happiness of the Blessed Dead, 1847.

Bishop Mant is known chiefly through his translations from the Latin. He was one of the earliest of the later translators, I. Williams and J. Chandler being his contemporaries. Concerning his translations, Mr. Ellerton, in his Notes on Church Hymns, 1881, p. xlviii. (folio ed.), says justly that:

"Mant had little knowledge of hymns, and merely took those of the existing Roman Breviary as he found them: consequently he had to omit many, and so to alter others that they have in fact become different hymns: nor was he always happy in his manipulation of them. But his book has much good taste and devout feeling, and has fallen into undeserved neglect."

His metrical version of the Psalms has yielded very few pieces to the hymnals, the larger portion of his original compositions being from his work of 1837. The most popular of these is "Come Holy Ghost, my soul inspire, Spirit of," &c, and its altered forms; "Bright the vision that delighted," and its altered form of "Round the Lord in glory seated;" and "For all Thy saints, O Lord." His hymns in common use which are not annotated under their respective first lines are:

i. From his Metrical Version of the Psalms, 1824.
1. God, my King, Thy might confessing. 
Ps. cxlv.
2. Lord, to Thee I make my vows. 
Ps. xxvii.
3. Blessed be the Lord most High. 
Ps. xxviii. Pt. ii.
4. My trust is in the highest Name. 
Ps. xi.
5. Reign, Jehovah, King supreme. 
Ps. xcix.
6. Thy listening ear, O Lord, incline. 
Ps. Ixxxvi.
7. To God my earnest voice I raise. 
Ps. cxlii.
8. To Jehovah hymn the lay. 
Ps. cxviii. Two centos in Spurgeon's Our Own Hymn Book, 1866. (1) st. i., ii., v.; and (2) "Thee, Jehovah, will I bless" from st. vii.-x.
ii. From his 
Holydays of the Church, &c, 1828-31.
9. Lo, the day the Lord hath made. 
Easter.
10. There is a dwelling place above. 
All Saints.
iii. From his 
Ancient Hymns, &c, 1837.
11. Before Thy mercy's throne. 
Lent.
12. Father of all, from Whom we trace. 
Unity.
13. For these who first proclaimed Thy word. 
Apostles.
14. No! when He bids me seek His face. 
Holy Communion.
15. Oft as in God's own house we sit. 
Divine Worship.
16. Put off thy shoes, 'tis holy ground. 
The House of God .
17. Saviour of men, our Hope [Life] and Rest. 
The Greater Festivals.
18. Thy House each day of hallowed rest. 
Holy Communion.
19. We bless Thee for Thy Church, O Lord. 
Thanksgiving for the Church.
26. We deem and own it, Lord, a proof. 
Divine Grace.
When all Bishop Mant's translations of original hymns, and versions of the Psalms in common use are taken into account, it is found that he is somewhat strongly represented in modern hymnody.

-- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

 

Frequently altered.

In general, the centos can be classified as whether they begin with the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd verse from the original:

1. Saviour, who, exalted high or Jesus, Now Exalted High (3x)
2. Son of God, to thee I cry! (2x)
3. Son of man, to thee I cry! (2x)

See:

Savior, Who, Exalted High. Roundell Palmer, ed., The Book of Praise (D. Lothrop & Co., Boston, Mass., 1865), No. LXIX, p. 73. Verses 1, 2, 7, 9 of the original, alt. Text only.

Saviour, Who, Exalted High. Version 1 from Charles Rogers, ed., Lyra Britannica (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1867), pp. 392-93. Verses 1, 2, 7, 9 of the original. Text only.

Son Of Man, To Thee We Cry. Version 2 from Charles Rogers, ed., Lyra Britannica (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1867), pp. 392-93. Verses 3, 6, 8, 9 of the original, alt. Text only.

Son of Man, To Thee I Cry. Church Hymns (London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1871), #502. S.P.C.K. Verses 3, 6, 8, 9 of the original. Text only.

Jesus, Now Exalted High. Thomas Darling, Hymns for the Church of England (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1871,) #XLVI. Verses 1, 2, 7, 9 of the original, alt. Text only.

Son of God, To Thee I Cry. W. Fleming Stevenson, Hymns for the Church and Home (London: Henry S. King and Co., 1873), #236. Verses 2, 6, 8, 9 of the original, alt. Text only.

Son of God, To Thee I Cry. James Turle, ed., Psalms and Hymns for Public Worship (London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1882), No. 285, p. 377. Verses 2, 6, 8, 9 of the original. Tune: "Birchington," 77 77 77. "Original Tune of 'Passionslied,' by Sigmund Von Birken." Note: "Born near Eger, in Bohemia, 1626; died at Nurnberg, 1681. He assumed the name of Betulius."

Son of God, To Thee I Cry, Arthur Sullivan, Church Hymns With Tunes (London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1898), #502, p. 428. Tune: "Verona," 77 77 77, "Italian Melody."

Also found in The Book of Christmas Hymns (London: T. Nelson and Sons, 1868), pp. 101-104. Four stanzas of varying lines. Verses 1, 2, 7, 9. Text only.

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