The Hymns and Carols of Christmas

Fare Wele, Aduent: Cristemas Is Cum

For Christmas

First Line: "With paciens thou hast vs fedde"

Words: Attributed to James Ryman

Music: Not Stated

Source: "Fare wele, aduent: cristemas is cum," Carol #70, pp. 238-240, in "Die Gedichte des Frauziskaners Jakob Ryman," from Stephan Waetzoldt and Julius Zupitza, eds., Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen. (Braunschweig: G. Westermann, 1892), pp. 167-338.

LXX.

Fare wele, aduent: cristemas is cum.
Fare wele fro vs both alle and sume.

1.

With paciens thou hast vs fedde
And made vs go hungrie to bedde:
For lak of mete we were nyghe dedde.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

2.
While thou haste be within oure howse,
We ete no puddyngis ne no sowce,
But stynking fisshe not worthe a lowce.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

3.
There was no fresshe fisshe ferre ne nere,
Saltfisshe and samon was to dere,
And thus we haue had hevy chere.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

4.
Thou hast vs fedde with plaices thynne
Nothing on them but bone and skynne;
Therfore oure loue thou shalt not wynne.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

5.
With muskillis gaping afture the mone
Thou hast vs fedde at nyght and none
But ones a wyke and that to sone.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

6.
Oure brede was browne, oure ale was thynne;
Oure brede was musty in the bynne,
Oure ale soure, or we did begynne.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

7.
Thou art of grete in-gratitude
Good mete fro vs for to exclude:
Thou art not kyende, but verey rude.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

8.
Thou dwellest with vs ayenst oure wille,
And yet thou gevest vs not oure fille:
For lak of mete thou woldest vs spille.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

9.
Aboue alle thinge thou art a meane
To make oure chekes bothe bare and leane:
I wolde, thou were at Boughton Bleane.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

10.
Come thou nomore here nor in Kent;
For, yf thou doo, thou shallt be shent:
It is ynough to faste in lent.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

11.
Thou maist not dwelle with none eastate;
Therfore with vs thou playest chekmate:
Go hens, or we will breke thy pate.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

12.
Thou maist not dwell with knyght nor squier:
For them thou maiste lye in the myre;
They loue not the nor lent, thy sire,
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

13.
Thou maist not dwell with labouring man ;
For on thy fare no skille he can ;
For he must ete bothe now and than.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

14.
Though thou shalt dwell with monke and frere,
Chanon and nonne ones euery yere,
Yet thou shuldest make vs better chere.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

15.
This tyme of Cristis feest natall
We will be mery, grete and small,
And thou shalt goo oute of this halle.
Fare wele fro us both alle and sume.

16.
Aduent is gone, cristemas is cume:
Be we mery now alle and sume.
He is not wise, that wille be dume
In ortu regis omnium.

Note:

A version with modernized spelling is available at "A Clerk At Oxford" blog, Farewell, Advent, Christmas Is Come, Friday, 23 December 2011, which begins:

Farewell, Advent, Christmas is come!
Farewell from us both all and some!

1. With patience thou hast us fed, ...

The Clerk at Oxford provided a translation of the last line: "At the coming of the King of all things."

This carol is found in the collection made by Franciscan James Ryman in 1492:

Farewell Advent, Christmas is come;
Farewell from us both all and some.

With patience thou has us fed
And made us go hungry to bed;
For lack of meat we were nigh dead;
Farewell from us both all and some.

On a similar theme, see Get the hence what doest thou here.

And, thanks to Harry in Glasgow for help in correcting an error on this page. Always appreciated!

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